Strabismus (Crossed Eye)

Strabismus refers to a pathological condition in which the eyes are not in a parallel position. Simply put, when the eyes are open, only one points towards the point of focus while the other is pointing in another direction. In this sense, eye synchronization holds a crucial role, and when it is not achieved, the brain sees two different images of the same object, resulting in what we call "strabismus."

Strabismus refers to a pathological condition in which the eyes are not in a parallel position. Simply put, when the eyes are open, only one points towards the point of focus while the other is pointing in another direction. In this sense, eye synchronization holds a crucial role, and when it is not achieved, the brain sees two different images of the same object, resulting in what we call "strabismus."

Types of Strabismus

strabismusStrabismus, depending on the direction towards which the straying eye is directed, is divided into four types: the converging eye otherwise know as esotropia (one eye directed inwards), the diverging eye otherwise know as the exotropia (one eye directing outwards), hypertrophy (one eye directing upwards) and hypotropia (one eye directing downwards). Strabism occurs either at birth or at an early age of an individual's life, with heredity being one of the predominant generative causes, whilst brain diseases as well as various diseases such as thyroid, diabetes are equally responsible.

And while for some strabismus is a situation that can be overcome over time, if ignored precisely the opposite happens, and the development of amblyopia (lazy eye) can also occur.

Treatment

Early diagnosis of any visual problem in the first few years of a child's life, and the correct treatment, improves vision incredibly.

True strabismus does not disappear without treatment and the lack of treatment can prove to be very harmful to our sight, even leading to permanent sight loss.

The treatment differs depending on the individual needs of each child, and may include a combination of eye coverage methods with or without glasses and sometimes surgery. Eye drops and exercises prescribed from your ophthalmologist also improve the problem.

Treatment for strabismus must begin as soon as possible, usually after the age of 6 months, with eye coverage methods, for a few hours a day so that vision can develop properly.

Prescribed glasses also make treatment much easier. Glasses help the child to focus properly using both eyes and not just the strong eye, since their focus is now on the glasses and not on the eye muscles, which in turn helps the eyes come in parallel. But to be effective, the child must continuously wear them.

In cases of hyperopia, as the child grows, the shape-changing eye becomes longer and less hypermetropic. Since the child would have needed glasses to help straighten his eyes, over the years the child will need weaker lenses and perhaps no glass by the time of puberty. However, if glasses are additionally administered to correct myopia or astigmatism, they may still be needed to help the child focus.

In the case where surgery is needed, its purpose is to cure only the percentage of strabismus that cannot be corrected by the glasses.

During the operation, a microscopic incision is made in the outer envelope of the eye, where the muscles of the eye are, and depending on the type of strabismus the muscles become stronger or weaker. The incision is closed with tiny stitches that are successively absorbed and do not need to be removed by the ophthalmologist.