Corneal – Keratoconus

The cornea is the part of the eye where rays of light enter. In a normal eye, light rays focus precisely on the retina, which is directly responsible for the treatment of the rays and the sending of stimuli to the optic nerve. The condition of keratoconus deforms the cornea, which is the tissue on the front of the eye, by bulging outwards, and doesn't let the rays of light pass through effectively. Consequently, the cornea's role is of utmost importance for the smooth functioning of vision, and any irregularity in the shape or even a small scar can cause vision problems.

The cornea is the part of the eye where rays of light enter. In a normal eye, light rays focus precisely on the retina, which is directly responsible for the treatment of the rays and the sending of stimuli to the optic nerve. The condition of keratoconus deforms the cornea, which is the tissue on the front of the eye, by bulging outwards, and doesn't let the rays of light pass through effectively. Consequently, the cornea's role is of utmost importance for the smooth functioning of vision, and any irregularity in the shape or even a small scar can cause vision problems.

Symptoms

KERATOCONUSKeratoconus is the condition that affects vision due to the shape of the cornea transforming from spherical to conical due to the thinning of the collagen fibers found in the cornea of ​​the eye. During this condition, people complain of photophobia and the presence of various images around images as well as instability in the grades of their glasses at regular intervals.

Keratoconus occurs during adolescence and may increase up to the 40th year of human life affecting about one person in every 2000. Despite the extensive studies carried out in this field, the causes of keratoconus formation are inconclusive, while genetic and environmental factors (heredity and friction of the eyes) as well as cellular changes (allergies) seem to play an important role.

Treatment

Keratoconus is a corneal disorder in which the shape and consequently the entire structure of the corneal decreases more and more, resulting in a conical shape (outwards bulge). The treatment of keratoconus is not an easy task but in recent years there have been major improvements in the techniques used in this field that slow down its development.

Among these techniques is the pioneering method "Corneal Cross Linking" which involves collagen fiber interconnection with the ultimate goal of strengthening and at the same time stabilizing the cornea. This process is accomplished by using riboflavin (vitamin B2) and ultraviolet radiation. It is painless and lasts about half an hour after the anesthesia takes effect on the eye. During this process, first the corneal epithelium is removed and riboflavin drops are placed in the eye for about ten minutes, and when irritation of the deeper layers of the cornea with riboflavin is observed, irradiation of the cornea with ultraviolet UVA is preformed for three minutes. At the end of the treatment, a contact lens is placed in the eye and remains there for 2-3 days (until the epithelium is regenerated) and then removed. The "Corneal Cross Linking" method is unreservedly recommended as a safe method that ensures very good results.